23:3 (2008:09) 23rd Conference (2008): Brainstorming Session: Working Collaboratively With Other Organizations

September 12, 2008 at 3:26 pm | Posted in Brainstorming, Conference Reports | Leave a comment

BRAINSTORMING SESSION

WORKING COLLABORATIVELY WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS

Moderated by Jill Emery, University of Texas
Reported by Lori J. Terrill

The brainstorming topic this year was working collaboratively with other organizations.  Specifically, what do NASIG members think of the idea?  What groups might we choose to work with on a project?  What types of projects should we do?  One example of collaboration this year was the NISO preconference on metadata.

Betty Landesman brainstorms

Betty Landesman brainstorms

The floor was open for comments and ideas which included:

•    Partner with CONSER, including presenting Serials Cataloging Cooperative Training Program, SCCTP, workshops as preconferences.  This has been done in the past.
•    Partner with the United Kingdom Serials Group, UKSG, specifically presenting a UKSG program at NASIG.
•    Partner with library schools.
•    Partner with the North Carolina Serials Conference.
•    Partner with the Ohio Academic Libraries Group.
•    Target under-represented groups, such as public librarians.  The Public Library Association, PLA, could be a potential partner.
•    Partner with state or regional library associations, particularly those affiliated with the state the annual takes place in that year.
•    NASIG should have a presence at state and regional library conferences.  NASIG members could take brochures and set up a table in the vendor exhibits.  NASIG could provide a guide for doing this, including talking points.
•    Members could consult NASIG’s Speakers and Consultants Directory when planning local conferences.
•    Target more conference programming towards non-librarians so that their organizations/companies will want to partner with us.
•    Partner with publishers, including international ones.
•    Partner with Society for Scholarly Publishing, SSP.  This would be a particularly good time to do this as their current president is a NASIG member, October Ivins.
•    Implementation of a year-long mentoring program could be a way to develop relationships with publishers.
•    NASIG members could serve as an advisory group to small publishers.
•    Collaborations would not have to be at the annual conference, they could also be at a regional continuing education event.
•    Consider joint or overlapping conferences with other organizations.
•    From the annual conference create “the best of NASIG” to take on the road as programming for other conferences or continuing education events.  Note:  The Executive Board is already talking about this possibility.  Programs would not necessarily have to be delivered by the original presenters.

There was a suggestion to change the time of year that the NASIG annual conference is held because it is too close to the American Library Association’s annual conference and some state conferences.  This idea led to a lively discussion generating some additional points:

•    Moving the conference requires changing the NASIG calendar and we would have to go more than a year without a conference.
•    June is a busy time for publishers.
•    If we move the conference, weather could be a problem with winter weather conditions to deal with in the north and extreme heat and/or humidity possible in the south, depending on the month selected.
•    What months have the fewest conflicting events, possibly February and March?
•    We could pick the month by whom we want to partner with in a given year and plan our conference timing and location around their conference.  Would this impact our ability to negotiate good deals with conference facilities?

Jill thanked everyone for participating and invited members to send any additional comments to any of the Executive Board members.

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